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Excel Basics

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The basic elements of Excel use the following functions: SUM, COUNT, AVERAGE, TIME & DATE. With this tutorial, you will be able to perform calculations and keep time records.

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How To Subtract Numbers

Important: The calculated results of formulas (e.g. how to subtract numbers) and some Excel worksheet functions may differ slightly between a Windows PC using x86 or x86-64 architecture and a Windows RT PC using ARM architecture. Learn more about the differences.

Applies to: Excel for Microsoft 365, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013, Excel 2010, Excel 2007.

Let’s propose you want to confirm how many inventory items are unprofitable (subtract profitable items from total inventory). Alternatively, perhaps you must know how many employees are reaching retirement age (subtract the number of employees under 55 from total employees).

What do you want to do?

There are multiple ways to subtract numbers, including:
 

Subtracting numbers in a cell

Firstly, to do basic subtraction, use the  (minus sign) arithmetic operator.

For example, if you input the formula =10-5 into a cell, the cell will present 5 as the result.

An example of entering cell references in an Excel formula and subtracting numbers.
© Lifewire, 2019.

Subtract numbers in a range

Adding a negative number is equivalent to subtracting one number from another. Use the SUM function to add negative numbers in a range.
 

Note: No SUBTRACT function exists in Excel. Use the SUM function and convert any desired numbers you want to subtract to their negative values. For example, SUM(100,-32,15,-6) returns 77.

Example

Follow these steps to subtract numbers in various ways:

  1. Firstly, choose all of the rows in the table below. Then, press CTRL-C on your keyboard.
Data
15000
9000
-8000
Formula
=A2-A3Subtracts 9,000 from 15,000 (which equals 6,000).
-SUM(A2:A4)Adds every number in the list, even negative numbers (net result is 16,000).
  1. Secondly, in the worksheet, pick cell A1. Then, press CTRL+V.
  2. Finally, to change between viewing the results and viewing the formulas, press CTRL+` (grave accent) on your keyboard. Alternatively, press the Show Formulas button (on the Formulas tab).

Using the SUM function

The SUM function totals all the numbers that you set as arguments. Most importantly, each argument can be a range, a cell reference, an array, a constant, a formula, or the result from a different function. For instance, SUM(A1:A5) adds all the numbers in the range of cells A1 to A5. Another example is SUM(A1, A3, A5) which adds the numbers that are occupied in cells A1, A3, and A5 (A1, A3, and A5 are arguments).

How To Calculate Percentages

Often percentages can be frustrating because it’s sometimes challenging to remember what we learned about them in school. Using Excel helps you to learn how to calculate percentages of numbers for you – simple formulas can assist you in finding the percentage of a total, for example, or the percentage difference between two numbers.

Applies to: Excel for Microsoft 365, Excel for Microsoft 365 for Mac, Excel for the web, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2019 for Mac, Excel 2013, Excel 2010, Excel 2007, Excel 2016 for Mac, Excel for Mac 2011.

Windows

Important: The calculated results of formulas and some Excel worksheet functions may differ slightly between a Windows PC using x86 or x86-64 architecture and a Windows RT PC using ARM architecture. Learn more about the differences.

Find the percentage of a total

Imagine that your company sold $125,000 this quarter, and you must discover what percentage $20,000 is of the total.

  1. To check, divide $20,000 by $125,000. Here’s the formula in cell C2: =B2/A2. The result is displayed as 0.16 because cell C2 is formatted differently compared to a percentage.
$125,000 in cell A2, $20,000 in cell B2, and 0.16 in cell C3 - finding the percentage of numbers.
  1. To format 0.16 as a percentage, (which will also delete the zero) on the Home tab, select the Percentage button. If you are using Excel for the Web, press Home > Number Format > Percentage.
Percentage button on the Home tab
  1. Now we see that $20,000 is 16% of $125,000.
$125,000 in cell a2, $20,000 in cell b2, and 16% in cell c2

Tip: Formatting is crucial in getting answers laid out as percentages. Learn more in displaying numbers as percentages.

Find the percentage of change between two numbers

A company sold $485,000 in 2011 and $598,634 in 2012. What’s the percent change between the two years?

  1. Firstly, select cell B3 to import the Percentage format to the cell. On the Home tab, choose the Percentage button. If you are using Excel for the Web, pick Home > Number Format > Percentage.
  2. In cell B3, divide the second year’s sales ($598,634.00) by the first year ($485,000.00), and then subtract 1.
$485,000 in cell A2, $598,634 in cell B2, and 23% in cell B3, the percentage of change between the two numbers
  1. Here’s the formula in cell C3. =(B2/A2)-1. The percentage of change between the two years is 23%. Pay attention to the parentheses around (B2/A2). Excel calculates what’s in parentheses first, and then subtracts the 1.

See also

Multiply by a percentage

PERCENTRANK function

Calculate a running total

Sum values based on multiple conditions

Consider that you have to sum values with multiple conditions, like the sum of product sales in a certain region. This is a convenient time for using the SUMIFS function in a formula.

Applies to: Excel for Microsoft 365, Excel for the web, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013.

Check out this example in which we find ourselves with two conditions: we want the sum of Meat sales (from column C) in the South region (from column A).

Data in an Excel worksheet

Here’s a formula you can use to achieve this:

=SUMIFS(D2:D11,A2:A11,”South”,C2:C11,”Meat”)

As a result, you get the value 14,719.

Let’s inspect more closely at each element of the formula.

Breaking SUMIFS down – Step 1

=SUMIFS is an arithmetic formula. It calculates numbers, which in this case are in column D. Firstly, the first step is to clarify the location of the numbers:

=SUMIFS(D2:D11,

In other words, you intend to have the formula sum numbers in that column if they satisfy the conditions. That cell range is the first argument in this formula—the first aspect of data that the function must have as input.

Step 2

Secondly, you are looking to locate data that meets two conditions, so you type your first condition by defining the data’s location for function (A2:A11) and also what the condition is—which is “South”. Most importantly, be aware of the commas between the separate arguments:

=SUMIFS(D2:D11,A2:A11,”South”,

Quotation marks around “South” indicate that this is text data.

Step 3

Finally, you state the arguments for your second condition – the range of cells (C2:C11) that includes the word “meat,” alongside the word itself (surrounded by quotes) so that Excel can match it. End the formula with a closing parenthesis ). Then, press Enter. The result, once more, is 14,719.

=SUMIFS(D2:D11,A2:A11,”South”,C2:C11,”Meat”)

As you enter the SUMIFS function in Excel, if you forget the arguments, help is right at your disposal. After you enter =SUMIFS(, Formula AutoComplete displays below the formula, with the list of arguments in their correct order.

Seeing the image of Formula AutoComplete and the list of arguments, in our example sum_range is D2:D11, the column of numbers you plan to sum; criteria_range1 is A2.A11, the column of data where criteria1 “South” is found.

Using Formula AutoComplete to enter the SUMIFS function to sum values with multiple conditions.

As you type, the remainder of the arguments will emerge in Formula AutoComplete (not illustrated here); criteria_range2 is C2:C11, the column of data where criteria2 “Meat” situates.

If you select SUMIFS in Formula AutoComplete, an article launches to provide you more info.

Give it a try

If you want to play around with the SUMIFS function, here’s some sample data and a formula that applies the function.

You can work with sample data and formulas directly here, in this Excel for the Web workbook. Edit values and formulas, or insert your own values and formulas and watch the results change in real-time.

Copy all the cells in the table underneath, and paste into cell A1 in a new worksheet in Excel. You might want to extend column widths to have a better view of formulas.

RegionSalespersonTypeSales
SouthItoBeverages3571
WestLanninDairy3338
EastMakovecBeverages5122
NorthMakovecDairy6239
SouthJordanProduce8677
SouthLanninMeat450
SouthLanninMeat7673
EastMakovecProduce664
NorthLanninProduce1500
SouthJordanMeat6596
FormulaDescriptionResult
‘=SUMIFS(D2:D11,A2:A11,
“South”, C2:C11,”Meat”)
Sums the Meat Sales in
Column C in the South
region in Column A (result is 14719).
=SUMIFS(D2:D11,A2:A11,
“South”, C2:C11,”Meat”)

Notes: 

  • Want further examples to sum values with multiple conditions? You’ll find more in the SUMIFS function article.
  • If you want to produce a total value for only one range based on a value in another range, use the SUMIF function.

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Find links (external references) in a workbook

Linking to other workbooks is a regular task in Excel, but often you may find yourself with a workbook containing links you struggle to locate despite Excel saying the contrary. There is no instant way to track down every external reference that is used in a workbook, although there are multiple manual methods you can use to uncover them. You must check in formulas, defined names, objects (like text boxes or shapes), chart titles, and chart data series to find workbook links.

Applies to: Excel for Microsoft 365, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013, Excel 2010 Excel 2007.

Any Excel workbook you’ve linked to will include that workbook’s filename in the link with its .xl* file extension (like .xls, .xlsx, .xlsm), so a recommended method is to search for all references to the .xl partial file extension. If you’re linking to another source, you’ll have to decide the optimal search term to use.

Find links used in formulas

  1. Press Ctrl+F to reveal the Find and Replace dialogue.
  2. Select Options.
  3. In the Find what box, type .xl.
  4. Inside the Within box, pick Workbook.
  5. In the Look in box, choose Formulas.
  6. Press Find All.
  7. In the list box that is presented, search in the Formula column for formulas that include .xl. In this case, Excel found several instances of Budget Master.xlsx.
Find and Replace dialogue to find workbook links.
  1. To select the cell with an external reference, click the cell address link for that row in the list box.

Tip: Click any column header to sort the column, and group all of the external references together.

Find links used in defined names

  1. On the Formulas tab, in the Defined Names group, select Name Manager.
  2. Check each entry in the list, and look in the Refers To column for external references. External references include a reference to another workbook, such as [Budget.xlsx].
Name Manager dialogue to find workbook links.

Tips: 

  • Choose any column header to sort the column, and group all of the external references together.
  • You can group several items with the Shift or Ctrl keys and Left-click if you want to delete numerous items at once.

Find links used in objects, like text boxes or shapes

  1. Press Ctrl+G, the shortcut for the Go To dialogue, then pick Special > Objects > OK. This will choose all objects on the active worksheet.
Go To > Special dialogue to find workbook links.
  1. Press the Tab key to toggle between each of the chosen objects, and then scan the formula bar Button image for a reference to another workbook, like [Budget.xlsx].
Shape selected to show link name in the Formula bar to find workbook links.

Find links used in chart titles

  1. Select the chart title on your desired chart to check.
  2. In the formula bar Button image , check for a reference to another workbook, such as [Budget.xls].

Find links used in chart data series

  1. Click your preferred chart to check.
  2. On the Layout tab, in the Current Selection group, select the arrow beside the Chart Elements box, and then choose your sought data series to check.Select a Series option in Chart options > Format > Current Selection
  3. In the formula bar Button image , search for a reference to another workbook, like [Budget.xls] in the SERIES function.

Need more help?

You can always ask an expert in the Excel Tech Community, get support in the Answers community, or suggest a new feature or improvement on Excel User Voice.

See Also

Fix broken links

Break a link to an external reference in Excel

Control when external references (links) are updated

Adding values in spreadsheets

  • Excel for Microsoft 365, Excel for the web, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013, Excel 2010, Excel 2007.

A fast and simple way to adding values in spreadsheets is through AutoSum. Firstly, choose an empty cell right below a column of data. Then, select AutoSum > Sum on the Formula tab. As a result, Excel will now capture the range to be added. (AutoSum can even work along the same row if you pick an empty cell to the right of the cells to be summed.)

You can use the AutoSum Wizard for adding values in spreadsheets to automatically build a Sum formula.  Select a range above/beneath or left/right of the range to be summed and goto the Formula tab on the Ribbon, then select AutoSum & SUM.

AutoSum builds the formula for you, saving you from having to type at all. However, if you prefer entering the formula manually, see the SUM function

Add based on conditions

  • Use the SUMIF function for any time you want to adding values in spreadsheets with one condition. For example, when you have to calculate the total sales of one product.
  • Use the SUMIFS function for when you want to sum values with several conditions. For instance, you may want to add up the total sales of a given product, within a certain sales region.

Add or subtract dates

For a summary of how to add or take away dates, see Add or subtract dates. For more complex date calculations, see Date and time functions.

Add or subtract time

For a summary of how to add or subtract time, see Add or subtract time. For different time calculations, see Date and time functions.

Need more help?

You can always ask an expert in the Excel Tech Community, get support in the Answers community, or suggest a new feature or improvement on Excel User Voice.

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Format numbers

Import number formatting, like dates, currency, or fractions to cells in a worksheet. For instance, if you’re completing your quarterly budget, you can apply the Currency number format. This will present your numbers in a way to symbolise money.

Applies to: Excel for Microsoft 365, 2019, 2016, 2013, 2011, 2010 & 2007 (both Windows and Mac where applicable).

Alternatively, if you have a column of dates, you can clearly state that you prefer the dates to display as March 14, 2012, 14-Mar-12, or 3/14.

Using number formatting

  1. Firstly, choose the cells with your particular numbers you have to format.
  2. Secondly, press CTRL+1 (on Windows). Alternately, press Control+1, or Command+1 (on a Mac)
  3. Thirdly, click the Number tab. Do this in the Format Cells popup window.
  4. Finally, select your desired number format Category. Then, pick precise formatting changes by the right.
Format Cells dialogue box showing Currency formats within number formatting.

Tip: Do you have numbers appearing in your cells as #####? This likely means your cell is too narrow to display the full number.

Simply double-click the right border of the column including the cells with #####.

This will change the column width and row height to occupy the number. As well as this, you can drag the right border of the column to customise the size to your preferences.

Stop your numbers from automatically formatting

Often, you could type numbers into a cell—or transfer them from a different data source—however, Excel formats those numbers differently than from what you anticipate. If, for instance, you enter a number along with a slash mark (/) or a hyphen (-), Excel may assume you’re entering a date and set a Date format.

You can stop this automatic number formatting by defining the Text format to the cells.

This is simple to do:

  1. Firstly, choose the cells with the required numbers to impede automatic formatting.
  2. Secondly, for Windows, press CTRL+1. On a Mac, press Control+1, or Command+1.
  3. Finally, on the Number tab, pick Text in the Category list.
Save as Text in the Format Cells dialogue box as an example of number formatting.

Need more help?

Here are some ways to resolve your queries and/or make a suggestion to Excel.

See Also

Format a date the way you want

Display numbers as percentages

Format negative percentages to make them easy to find

Format numbers as currency

Create a custom number format

Convert dates stored as text to dates

Convert numbers stored as text to numbers

Keyboard shortcuts in Publisher

Applies to: Publisher for Microsoft 365, Publisher 2019, Publisher 2016, Publisher 2013.

Often, you can work quicker by resting your fingers on the keyboard instead of alternating to the mouse or touch pad. You possibly have previously used shortcuts like Ctrl+C for Copy and Ctrl+S for Save, but you may be unaware of the remaining shortcuts. Here they are:

In this article

New shortcuts

Shape and Picture Effects

Shape effects

Picture effects

Text Effects

Text fill drop-down

Text outline drop-down

Text effects drop-down

Create, open, close, or save a publication

Create, open, close a publication

Edit or format text or objects

Edit or format text

Copy text formats

Copy, cut, paste or delete text or objects

Undo or redo an action

Nudge an object

Layer objects

Snap objects

Select or group objects

Work with pages

Select or insert pages

Move between pages

Use the master page

Show or hide boundaries or guides

Zoom

Print a publication

Using Print Preview

Print a publication

Insert hyperlinks

Send e-mail

Automate tasks

Work with macros

Work with Visual Basic

Ribbon shortcuts

These shortcuts were launched with the Publisher ribbon. Some tabs are variable and display only once you’ve added or picked an object like a shape or a table. The double-letter shortcuts enable the use of keyboard shortcuts with contextual tabs.

New keyboard shortcuts, using double letters, opening the Drawing Tools tab.

To employ these, first choose the object, then press Alt, press the two letter context menu shortcut, and then tap the leftover keys, if any. For example, to access the Shape Effects menu and append a shadow to a shape you click the shape, press AltJD to enter the Drawing Tools – Format tab, SE to access the Shape Effects menu, S to pick the Shadow Gallery, and then tab across the shadow options to import the shadow to your shape.

Shape and Picture Effects

Shape effects

To do thisPress
Open the Shape Effects MenuAlt, JD, SE
Open the Shape Effects – Shadow GalleryAlt, JD, SE, S – then tab through options
Open the Shape Effects – Reflection GalleryAlt, JD, SE, R – then tab through options
Open the Shape Effects – Glow GalleryAlt, JD,SE,G- then tab through options
Open the Shape Effects – Soft Edges GalleryAlt, JD,SE,E – then tab through options
Open the Shape Effects – Bevel GalleryAlt, JD,SE,B – then tab through options
Open the Shape Effects – 3-D Rotation GalleryAlt, JD,SE,D – then tab through options
Open the Shape Styles GalleryAlt, JD,ST – then tab through options

Picture effects

To do thisPress
Open the Picture Effects MenuAlt, JP,PE
Open the Picture Effects – Shadow GalleryAlt, JP,PE,S – then tab through options
Open the Picture Effects – Reflection GalleryAlt, JP,PE,R – then tab through options
Open the Picture Effects – Glow GalleryAlt, JP,PE,G – then tab through options
Open the Picture Effects – Soft Edges GalleryAlt, JP,PE,E – then tab through options
Open the Picture Effects – Bevel GalleryAlt, JP,PE,B – then tab through options
Open the Picture Effects – 3-D Rotation GalleryAlt, JP,PE,D – then tab through options
Open the Picture Styles GalleryAlt, JP,K – then tab through options
Clear Picture StyleAlt, JP,K,C

Text Effects

Text fill drop-down

To do thisPress
Open Text Fill Drop-downAlt, JX,TI
No FillAlt, JX,TI,N – then tab through options
More Fill Colours…Alt, JX,TI,M – then tab through options
Fill Effects…Alt, JX,TI,F – then tab through options
TintsAlt, JX,TI,T – then tab through options
Sample Font ColourAlt, JX,TI,S

Text outline drop-down

To do thisPress
Open Text Outline Drop-downAlt ,JX,TO
No OutlineAlt ,JX,TO,N
More Outline Colours…Alt, JX,TO,M – then tab through options
Outline Effects…Alt. JX.TO.O – then tab through options
Sample Line ColourAlt, JX,TO,S – then tab through options
WeightAlt, JX,TO,W – then tab through options
DashesAlt, JX,TO,D – then tab through options

Text effects drop-down

To do thisPress
Open Text Effects Drop-downAlt, JX,TE
ShadowAlt, JX, TE,S – then tab through options
ReflectionAlt, JX, TE,R – then tab through options
GlowAlt, JX, TE,G – then tab through options
BevelAlt, JX, TE,B – then tab through options

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Create, open, close, or save a publication

Create, open, close a publication

To do thisPress
Open a new instance of PublisherCTRL+N
Display the Open Publication dialogue boxCTRL+O
Close the current publicationCTRL+F4 or CTRL+W
Display the Save As dialogue boxCTRL+S

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Edit or format text or objects

Edit or format text

To do thisPress
Display the Find and Replace task pane, with the Find option selectedF3 or CTRL+F or SHIFT+F4
Display the Find and Replace task pane, with the Replace option selectedCTRL+H
Check spellingF7
Display the Thesaurus task paneSHIFT+F7
Display the Research task paneALT + click a word
Select all the text (If the cursor is in a text box, this selects all text in the current story; if the cursor is not in a text box, this selects all the objects on a page.)CTRL+A
Make text boldCTRL+B
Italicise textCTRL+I
Underline textCTRL+U
Make text small capital letters, or return small capital letters to upper and lower caseCTRL+SHIFT+K
Open the Font dialogueCTRL+SHIFT+F
Copy formattingCTRL+SHIFT+C
Paste formattingCTRL+SHIFT+V
Turn Special Characters on or offCTRL+SHIFT+Y
Return character formatting to the current text styleCTRL+SPACEBAR
Apply or remove subscript formattingCTRL+=
Apply or remove superscript formattingCTRL+SHIFT+=
Increase space between letters in a word (kerning)CTRL+SHIFT+]
Decrease space between letters in a word (kerning)CTRL+SHIFT+[
Increase font size by 1.0 pointCTRL+]
Decrease font size by 1.0 pointCTRL+[
Increase to the next size in the Font Size boxCTRL+SHIFT+>
Decrease to the next size in the Font Size boxCTRL+SHIFT+<
Centre a paragraphCTRL+E
Align a paragraph on the leftCTRL+L
Align a paragraph on the rightCTRL+R
Align a paragraph on both sides (justified)CTRL+J
Distribute a paragraph evenly horizontallyCTRL+SHIFT+D
Set newspaper alignment for a paragraph (East Asian languages only)CTRL+SHIFT+J
Display the Hyphenation dialogue boxCTRL+SHIFT+H
Insert the current timeALT+SHIFT+T
Insert the current dateALT+SHIFT+D
Insert the current page numberALT+SHIFT+P
Prevent the word from getting hyphenated if it occurs at the end of a lineCTRL+SHIFT+0 (zero)

Copy text formats

To do thisPress
Copy formatting from the selected textCTRL+SHIFT+C
Apply copied formatting to textCTRL+SHIFT+V

Copy, cut, paste or delete text or objects

To do thisPress
Copy the selected text or objectCTRL+C or CTRL+INSERT
Cut the selected text or objectCTRL+X or SHIFT+DELETE
Paste text or an objectCTRL+V or SHIFT+INSERT
Delete the selected objectDELETE or CTRL+SHIFT+X

Undo or redo an action

To do thisPress
Undo what you last didCTRL+Z or ALT+BACKSPACE
Redo what you last didCTRL+Y or F4

Nudge an object

To do thisPress
Nudge a selected object up, down, left, or rightArrow keys
If the selected object has a cursor in its text, nudge the selected object up, down, left, or rightALT+arrow keys

Layer objects

To do thisPress
Bring object to frontALT+F6
Send object to backALT+SHIFT+F6

Snap objects

To do thisPress
Turn Snap to Guides on or offF10, SHIFT+R, SHIFT+S, SHIFT+M

Select or group objects

To do thisPress
Select all objects on the page (If your cursor is in a text box, this selects all the text in a story)CTRL+A
Group selected objects, or ungroup grouped objectsCTRL+SHIFT+G
Clear the selection from selected textESC
Clear the selection from a selected objectESC
Select the object within the group — if that object contains selected textESC

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Work with pages

Select or insert pages

If your publication is in Two-Page Spread view, these commands apply to the selected two-page spread. Otherwise, these apply only to the selected page.

To do thisPress
Display the Go To Page dialogue boxF5 or CTRL+G
Insert a page or a two-page spread. If you are creating a newsletter, it opens the Insert publication type Pages dialogue boxCTRL+SHIFT+N
Insert duplicate page after the selected pageCTRL+SHIFT+U

Move between pages

To do thisPress
Display the Go To Page dialogue box.F5 or CTRL+G
Go to the next pageCTRL+PAGE DOWN
Go to the previous pageCTRL+PAGE UP
Switch between the current page and the master pageCTRL+M

Use the master page

To do thisPress
Switch between the current page and the master page.CTRL+M

Show or hide boundaries or guides

To do thisPress
Turn Boundaries on or off.CTRL+SHIFT+O
Turn Horizontal Baseline Guides on or off (not available in web view)CTRL+F7
Turn Vertical Baseline Guides on or off (East Asian languages only—not available in web view)CTRL+SHIFT+F7

Zoom

To do thisPress
Switch between the current view and the actual sizeF9
Zoom to full page viewCTRL+SHIFT+L

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Printing

Using Print Preview

These keyboard shortcuts are available when you’re in Print view and affect the print preview pane.

To do thisPress
Switch between the current view and the actual sizeF9
Scroll up or downUP ARROW or DOWN ARROW
Scroll left or rightLEFT ARROW or RIGHT ARROW
Scroll up in large incrementsPAGE UP or CTRL+UP ARROW
Scroll down in large incrementsPAGE DOWN or CTRL+DOWN ARROW
Scroll left in large incrementsCTRL+LEFT ARROW
Scroll right in large incrementsCTRL+RIGHT ARROW
Scroll to the upper left corner of the pageHOME
Scroll to the lower right corner of the pageEND
Display the Go To Page dialogue boxF5 or CTRL+G
Go to the previous pageCTRL+PAGE UP
Go to the next pageCTRL+PAGE DOWN
Go to the next window (if you have multiple publications open)CTRL+F6
Exit Print Preview and display the Print viewCTRL+P
Exit Print PreviewESC

Print a publication

To do thisPress
Open the Print dialogue view.CTRL+P

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Work with web pages and email

Insert hyperlinks

To do thisPress
Display the Insert Hyperlink dialogue box (make sure your cursor is in a text box)CTRL+K

Send e-mail

After you choose Send as Message (File > Share > Email), you can use the following keyboard shortcuts.

Important:  Outlook needs to be open before you can send e-mail messages. If Outlook isn’t open, the message will be stored in your Outbox folder.

To do thisPress
Send the current page or publicationALT+S
Open the Address Book (cursor must be in the message header)CTRL+SHIFT+B
Open the Design Checker (cursor must be in the message header)ALT+K
Check the names on the ToCc, and Bcc lines (cursor must be in the message header)CTRL+K
Open the Address Book with the To box selected (cursor must be in the message header)ALT+. (period)
Open the Address Book with the Cc box selected (cursor must be in the message header)ALT+C
Open the Address Book with the Bcc box selected (cursor must be in the message header and the Bcc field must be visible)ALT+B
Go to the Subject boxALT+J
Open the Outlook Message Options dialogue boxALT+P
Open the Custom dialogue box to create an email message flag (cursor must be in the email message header)CTRL+SHIFT+G
Move the cursor to the next field in the email message header (cursor must be in the email message header)TAB
Move the cursor to the previous field in the email message headerSHIFT+TAB
Alternate between the insertion point in the email message header and the Send button in the Mailing toolbarCTRL+TAB
Open the Address Book when the cursor is in the e-mail message headerCTRL+SHIFT+B

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Automate tasks

Work with macros

To do thisPress
Display the Macros dialogue box.ALT+F8

Work with Visual Basic

To do thisPress
Display the Visual Basic editorALT+F11

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Microsoft Teams Quick Start – Video: What is Microsoft Teams?

Using Microsoft Teams on your PC, Mac, or mobile device, you can:

  • Assemble a team.
  • Utilise chat rather than e-mail.
  • Securely alter files simultaneously.
  • View likes, @mentions, and replies with only one tap.
  • Customise it by inserting notes, web sites, and apps.