Import or link to data in a text file

Applies to: Access for Microsoft 365, Access 2019, Access 2016, Access 2013, Access 2010, Access 2007.

You can relay data from a text file into Access in two ways. If you want a copy of the data that you can edit within Access, import the file into a new or current table by using the Import Text Wizard. If you only want to see the latest source data within Access for richer querying and reporting, generate a link to the text file in your database by using the Link Text Wizard.

This article explains how to import and link to a text file by using these wizards.

In this article

About text files and supported formats

Import data from a text file

What else should I know about importing?

Troubleshoot missing or incorrect values in an imported table

Link to a text file

Troubleshoot #Num! and incorrect values in a linked table

About text files and supported formats

A text file includes unformatted readable characters, such as letters and numbers, and special characters such as tabs, line feeds and carriage returns. Access supports the following file name extensions — .txt, .csv, .asc, and .tab.

To use a text file as a source file for importing or linking, the file contents must be specifically organised to ensure that the importing and linking wizards can split the contents into a set of records (rows) and each record into a collection of fields (columns). Text files that are organised properly fall into one of two types:

  • Delimited files  –  In a delimited file, every record is listed on a separate line and the fields are divided by a single character, called the delimiter. The delimiter can appear as any character that is absent from the field values, such as a tab, semicolon, comma, space, and so on. The following is an example of comma-delimited text.

1,Company A,Anna,Bedecs,Owner 2,Company C,Thomas,Axen,Purchasing Rep 3,Company D,Christina,Lee,Purchasing Mgr. 4,Company E,Martin,O’Donnell,Owner 5,Company F,Francisco,Pérez-Olaeta,Purchasing Mgr. 6,Company G,Ming-Yang,Xie,Owner 7,Company H,Elizabeth,Andersen,Purchasing Rep 8,Company I,Sven,Mortensen,Purchasing Mgr. 9,Company J,Roland,Wacker,Purchasing Mgr. 10,Company K,Peter,Krschne,Purchasing Mgr. 11,Company L,John,Edwards,Purchasing Mgr. 12,Company M,Andre,Ludo,Purchasing Rep 13,Company N,Carlos,Grilo,Purchasing Rep

  • Fixed-width files  –   In a fixed-width file, all records are presented on an individual line and the width of each field remains static across records. For example, the first field of every record is always seven characters long, the second field of every record is always 12 characters long, and so on. If the actual length of a field’s value changes from record to record, the values that fall short of the necessary width must be padded with trailing space characters. The following is an example of fixed-width text.

1 Company A Anna Bedecs Owner 2 Company C Thomas Axen Purchasing Rep 3 Company D Christina Lee Purchasing Mgr. 4 Company E Martin O’Donnell Owner 5 Company F Francisco Pérez-Olaeta Purchasing Mgr. 6 Company G Ming-Yang Xie Owner 7 Company H Elizabeth Andersen Purchasing Rep 8 Company I Sven Mortensen Purchasing Mgr. 9 Company J Roland Wacker Purchasing Mgr. 10 Company K Peter Krschne Purchasing Mgr. 11 Company L John Edwards Purchasing Mgr. 12 Company M Andre Ludo Purchasing Rep 13 Company N Carlos Grilo Purchasing Rep

Top of Page

Import data from a text file

If your objective is to store some or all data that is in a text file in an Access database, it is highly recommended that you import the contents of the file into a new table or add the data to an existing table. You can check and amend the imported data, and the changes you implement to the data leave the source text file intact.

Amid the import operation, you can specify how the source file is organised, and whether you want to design a new table or insert the data to an established table.

Tip: If you aren’t familiar with tables or how a database is structured, see the articles Create tables in a database or Database design basics.

At the end of the import operation, you can decide to save the details of the import operation as a specification. An import specification facilitates you repeating the operation in future without you walking through the Import Text Wizard each time.

Common scenarios for importing a text file into Access

Typically, you import text data into Access for these reasons:

  • Some of your data is in a format not recognised by Access and you want to use that data in one of your databases. You can initially export the source data as a text file and then import the contents of the text file into an Access table.
  • You use Access to organise your data, but you often receive data in text format from users of a different programme. You import the data at common periods, and you prefer to streamline the import process to save time and effort.

Note: When you open a text file in Access (by changing the Files of Type list box to All Files in the Open dialogue box and then selecting your text file), Access starts the Link Text Wizard, enabling you to create a link to the text file rather than importing its contents. Linking to a file is different from importing its contents. For more information about linking to text files, see the section Link to a text file, later in this article.

Prepare the source file

  1. Access the source text file in a text editor, such as Notepad.

Note: You can import only one text file during an import operation. To import multiple files, repeat the import operation for each file.

  1. Proofread the contents of the source text file and follow a process as described in this table.
ElementDescription
Delimited or fixed-widthMake sure the file consistently follows one of the formats. If the file is delimited, identify the delimiter. If the file has fixed-width fields, make sure each field is the same width in every record.
Text qualifiersSome delimited files might contain field values that are enclosed in single or double quotation marks, as shown here:

“Pernille Halberg”,25,4/5/2017,”New York”

“Daniel Brunner”,27,2018,”Chicago”

The character that encloses a field value is called a text qualifier. Text qualifiers are not required, but they are essential if either of the following is true:

The field delimiter appears as part of the field values. For example, if comma is used as the field delimiter, and New York, Chicago is a valid field value, you must enclose the value within a pair of qualifiers, like this: “New York, Chicago”

You want Access to treat non-text values, such as 0452934 and 0034539 as text values and store them in a Text field.

During the import operation, you can specify whether the file uses a qualifier and, if so, specify the character that acts as the qualifier.Make sure that the same text qualifier is used throughout the file and that only text values are enclosed within a pair of qualifiers.
Number of fieldsThe number of source fields must not exceed 255 — Access cannot support more than 255 fields in a table.
Skipping records and valuesIf you are interested in only a portion of the text file, edit the source file before you start the import operation. You cannot skip records during the import operation.

If you are adding the data to a new table, you can skip certain fields, but this option is not available if you are appending the contents to an existing table. When you append data to an existing table, the structure of the source data must match the structure of the destination table. In other words, the source data must have the same number of columns as the destination table, and the data types of the source data must match the data types of the destination table.
Blank lines and fieldsDelete all unnecessary blank lines in the file. If there are blank fields, try to add the missing data. If you are planning to append the records to an existing table, make sure the corresponding field in the table accepts null values. A field will accept null values if its Required field property is set to No and its ValidationRule property setting doesn’t prevent null values.
Extraneous charactersReview and remove extra characters, such as tabs, line feed, and carriage returns.
Data typesTo avoid errors during importing, make sure each source field contains the same type of data in every line. Access scans the first 25 rows of a file to determine the data type of the fields in the table. We highly recommend that you make sure that the first 25 source rows do not mix values of different data types in any of the fields. Also, make sure that non-text values that are to be treated as text values are enclosed in single or double quotation marks.

If the source file contains mixed values in the rows following the 25th row, the import operation might still skip them or convert them incorrectly. For troubleshooting information, see the section Troubleshoot missing or incorrect values in an imported table, later in this article.
Field namesFor delimited text files, if the file does not include the names of the fields, it is good practice to place them in the first row. During the import operation, you can specify that Access treat the values in the first row as field names. When you import fixed-width text files, Access does not give you the option of using the values in the first row as the field name.

Note: When you append a delimited text file to an existing table, ensure that the name of each column exactly matches the name of the corresponding field. If the name of a column is different from the name of the corresponding field in the table, the import operation fails. To find the names of the fields, open the destination table in Design view.

  1. Exit the source file, if it is open. Retaining the source file open may result in data conversion errors during the import operation.

Start the import process in Access

  1. Enter the Access database in which the imported data will be stored. If you don’t want to store the data in any of your existing databases, create a blank database.
  1. Before you start the import operation, confirm whether you want to store the data in a new or existing table.
  • Create new table  –  If you select to store the data in a new table, Access generates a table and appends the imported data to it. If a table with the specified name already exists, Access replaces the contents of the table with the imported data.
  • Append to an existing table  –  If you are importing the data to an existing table, the import process inserts the data to the specified table. As you continue, remember that many append operations malfunction because the source data is mismatched the structure and field settings of the destination table. To avoid this, access the table in Design view, and review the following:
  • First row  –  If the first row of the source text file is without any field names, ensure the position and data type of each column matches those of the associated field in the table. For delimited text files, if the first row includes column headings, the order of columns and fields must not match, but the name and data type of each column must precisely match those of its corresponding field. Once you import fixed-width text files, Access does not give you the option of using the values in the first row as the field name.
  • Missing or extra fields  – If one or additional fields are not in the destination table, append them before you start the import operation. However, if the destination table has fields that are absent from the source file, you shouldn’t automatically assume they must be deleted from the table provided that they accept null values.

Tip: A field will accept null values if its Required field property is set to No and its ValidationRule property setting doesn’t prevent null values.

  • Primary key  –  If the table has a primary key field, the source file must include a column that embodies values that are compatible with the primary key field. Moreover, the imported key values need to be unique. If an imported record includes an existing primary key value in the destination table, the import operation launches an error message. You must update the source data so that it includes unique key values and then start the import operation again.
  • Indexed fields  –  If the Indexed property of a field in the table is defined to Yes (No Duplicates), the matching column in the source text file must have unique values.

  1. The location of the import/link text wizard varies to some degree based upon your version of Access. Select the steps that match your Access version:
  • If you’re using the latest version of the Microsoft 365 subscription version of Access or Access 2019, on the External Data tab, in the Import & Link group, pick New Data Source > From File > Text File.
  • If you’re using Access 2016, Access 2013, or Access 2010, on the External Data tab, in the Import & Link group, choose Text File.

  1. Access displays the Get External Data – Text File dialogue box.Select to import, append, or link to a text file.
  2. In the Get External Data – Text File dialogue box, in the File name box, enter the name of the source file.
  1. Determine how you want to store the imported data.
  • To store the data in a new table, click Import the source data into a new table in the current database. You will be urged to name this table later.
  • To insert the data to an existing table, choose Append a copy of the records to the table and then pick a table from the drop-down list.

Note: To link to the data source by creating a linked table, see the section Link to a text file, later in this article.

  1. Press OK. Access traces the contents of the file and suggests how the file should be organised. If the file uses a delimiter to separate the fields, ensure that the Delimited option is selected. If the file has fixed-width fields, ensure that the Fixed Width option is selected. If you are unclear about whether your file has fixed-width or delimited fields, see the previous section, Prepare the source file.

Note: If the source text file contains tabs or other special characters, these are represented in the Import Text Wizard as small boxes between the columns of data.

  1. Press Next. The information that the wizard displays is determined by whether you choose the Delimited option or the Fixed-Width option.

Delimited

Pick or specify the character that delimits the field values – Tab, Semicolon, Comma, Space, or Other. If the file users a text qualifier, in the Text Qualifier box, click either the double quotation mark () or the single quotation mark (‘). If the first row of the source file includes field names, choose the First Row contains Field Names checkbox. Then, select Next.

Fixed-width

The wizard presents the contents of the file. If Access detects a columnar structure in the data, it positions vertical lines in the data to divide the fields. Review the structure advised by the wizard and, if necessary, refer to the instructions on the wizard page to create, erase, or modify the lines. Then, pick Next.

  1. If you chose to append the data, skip to step 13. If you are importing the data to a new table, press Next. At this point, you should review the field properties illustrated in the wizard.

Note: The wizard page on which you can specify information about fields you are importing is not displayed if you are appending records to an existing table.

  1. Select a column in the lower half of the wizard page to present the corresponding field’s properties. Review and change, if preferable, the name and data type of the destination field. Access reviews the first 25 rows in each column to recommend the default data type for the corresponding field. If there are various types of values, such as text and numeric values, in the first 25 rows of a column, the wizard implies a data type that is associated with all or most of the values in the column — that is often the Text data type. Although you can decide a different data type, remember that values that are incompatible with the data type you select are either ignored or converted incorrectly. For more information about how to correct missing or incorrect values, see the section Troubleshoot missing or incorrect values in an imported table, later in this article.
  1. To create an index on the field, set Indexed to Yes. To entirely skip a source column, choose the Do not import field (Skip) check box. Then, press Next.
  1. If the records are being imported to a new table, the wizard urges you to specify a primary key for the table. If you click Let Access add primary key, Access appends an AutoNumber field as the first field in the destination table, and promptly occupies it with unique IDs, starting with 1. Pick Next. Note: The wizard page on which you can specify information about fields you are importing is not displayed if you are appending records to an existing table.
  1. Access materialises the final page of the wizard. If you are importing records into a new table, set a name for the destination table. In the Import to Table box, enter a name for the table. If the table already exists, a message asks you whether you want to update the existing contents of the table. Press Yes to continue or No to specify a different name for the destination table. What is the Advanced button used for? The Advanced button in the Import Text Wizard enables you to produce or open an import specification in the format used by earlier versions of Access. Unless you have import specifications from previous versions of Access (before Access 2007), we advise that you do not use the Advanced button. On the contrary, if you want to save the details of this import operation, you can explore more about this procedure in the next section.
  1. Pick Finish to import the data. Access attempts to import the data. If any of the data is imported, the wizard launches a dialogue box that informs you about the status of the import operation. Contrastingly, if the operation wholly falls through, Access presents the error message An error occurred trying to import file.
  1. Access the destination table in Datasheet view. Compare the data in the table with the source file, and check the data is actually to be correct.

What else should I know about importing?

  • For information on how to change a specification name, delete specifications, or update the names of source files in specifications, see the article Manage Data Tasks.

Troubleshoot missing or incorrect values in an imported table

If you see the message An error occurred trying to import file, the import operation completely faltered. Conversely, if the import operation shows the page that encourages you to save the details of the operation, the operation succeeded in importing all or part of the data. The status message even references the name of the error log table that includes the description of any errors that took place during the import operation. It is vital to realise that even if the status message represents a successful operation, you should check the contents and structure of the table to guarantee that everything appears accurate before you start using the table.

Enter the destination table in Datasheet view to assess whether all the data was successfully imported to the table. You should then access the table in Design view to ascertain the data type and other property settings of the fields.

The following table summarises the steps you can take to correct missing or incorrect values.

Tip: While troubleshooting, if you find just a few missing values, you can add them directly to the table in Datasheet view. On the other hand, if you find entire columns or large number of values either missing or not imported properly, correct the problem in the source file. When you think you have corrected all known problems, repeat the import operation.

IssueResolution
-1 or 0 valuesIf the source file includes a field that contains only True or False values or only Yes or No values, and you selected Yes/No as the data type for the field, you will see -1 and 0 in the table. Open the table in Design view, and set the Format property to either True/False or Yes/No.
Multivalued fieldsAccess does not support importing multiple values in a field. The list of values are treated as a single value and placed in a text field, separated by semicolons.
Truncated dataIf data appears truncated in a column, try increasing the width of the column in Datasheet view. If increasing the width doesn’t resolve the issue, the cause might be that the data type of a numeric field is set to Long Integer when it should have been set to Double.
Data missing in primary key or indexed fieldsRecords that you are importing contain duplicate values that cannot be stored in the primary key field of the destination table or in a field that has the Indexed property set to Yes (No Duplicates) in an Access database. Eliminate the duplicate values in the source file and try importing again.
Null valuesWhen you open the table in Datasheet view, you might find that some fields are blank. Do the following to minimise or eliminate any instances of null values in the table:

If the first 25 source rows contain values of different data types, open the source file and rearrange the lines to make sure the first 25 rows do not contain mixed values in any of the fields. Then, try importing again.


Enclose all non-text values that you want to store as text values in single or double quotation marks.

During the import operation, select the appropriate data type for each field. If the data type is incorrect, you might see null values or incorrect values in the entire column.

In addition, you may want to check the error log table from the last page of the wizard in Datasheet view. The table comprises three fields — Error, Field, and Row. Each row embodies information about a specific error, and the contents of the Error field should guide you to troubleshoot the problem.

Complete list of error strings and troubleshooting hints

ErrorDescription
Field TruncationA value in the file is too large for the FieldSize property setting for this field.
Type Conversion FailureA value in the text file or worksheet is the wrong data type for this field. The value might be missing or might appear incorrect in the destination field. See the entries in the preceding table for more information about how to troubleshoot this issue.
Key ViolationThis record’s primary key value is a duplicate — that is, it already exists in the table.
Validation Rule FailureA value breaks the rule set by using the ValidationRule property for this field or for the table.
Null in Required FieldA null value isn’t allowed in this field because the Required property for the field is set to Yes.
Null value in AutoNumber fieldThe data that you are importing contains a null value that you attempted to append to an AutoNumber field.
Unparsable RecordA text value contains the text delimiter character (usually double quotation marks). Whenever a value contains the delimiter character, the character must be repeated twice in the text file; for example:10 – 3 1/2″” disks/box

Top of Page

Link to a text file

You use linking to connect to data in another file without importing it — by doing so, you can view the latest data in both the original programme and in the Access file without forming and sustaining a copy in Access. If you don’t want to copy the contents of the text file into your Access database, but still want to perform queries and generate reports based on that data, you should link to, rather than import, the text file.

After you link to a text file, Access generates a new table that is linked to the source file. Any changes you make to the source file are mirrored in the linked table, however, you will not be able to amend the contents of the corresponding table in Access. If you want to apply changes to the contents or structure of the data, you should open the source file and make the changes in it.

Common scenarios for linking to a text file from within Access

  • You use a programme that outputs data in text format, but you want to use the data for deeper analysis and reporting by using multiple applications, one of them being Access.
  • The data you want to work is supported by a different department or workgroup. You want to view the newest data, but don’t want to edit or maintain a copy of your own.

If this is the first time you are linking to a text file

  • Once you link to a text file, Access forms a new table, often referred to as a linked table. The linked table displays the data from the source file, but it doesn’t actually store the data in the database.
  • You cannot link a text file to an existing table in the database. Put simply, you cannot add data to an existing table by conducting a linking operation.
  • A database can include multiple linked tables.
  • Any changes that you make to the source file are instantly reflected in the linked table. However, the contents and structure of a linked table in Access are read-only.
  • Once you open a text file in Access, Access produces a blank database and promptly starts the Link Text Wizard.

Steps for linking to a text file

  1. Find the text file, and open it in a word processing programme, such as Word or Notepad. Note that you can link to only one text file a time during a link operation. To link to multiple text files, repeat the link operation for each file.
  1. Inspect the contents of the source file, and take steps action as described in the following table:
ElementDescription
Delimited or fixed-widthVerify that the file consistently follows one of the formats. If the file is delimited, root out the delimiting character. If the file has fixed-width fields, guarantee that each field is the same width in every record.
Text qualifiersSome delimited files may include field values that are contained in single or double quotation marks, as shown here:

“Pernille Halberg”,25,4/5/2017,”New York”

“Daniel Brunner”,27,2018,”Chicago”

The character that encompasses field value is called a text qualifier. Text qualifiers are optional, but they are necessary if:

The field delimiter displays as part of the field values. For example, if a comma is used as the field delimiter, and New York, Chicago is a valid field value, you must include the value within a pair of qualifiers, such as: “New York, Chicago”.

You want Access to treat non-text values, such as 0452934 and 0034539, as text values and store them in a text field.

During the linking operation, you can dictate whether the file uses a qualifier and, if so, you state the character that acts as the qualifier.

Make sure that the same text qualifier is used across the file and that only text values are wrapped within a pair of qualifiers.
Number of fieldsThe number of source fields must not exceed 255 — Access cannot support over 255 fields in a table.
Skipping records and fieldsYou can skip specific fields, but you cannot skip records.
Blank lines and fieldsErase all unnecessary blank lines in the file. If there are blank fields, first attempt to insert the missing data in the source file.
Extraneous charactersReview and delete extra characters, such as tabs, line feeds, and carriage returns.
Data typesTo avoid errors during linking, inspect every source field for including the consistent variant of data in every line. Access scans the first 25 rows of a file to ascertain the data type of the fields in the table. We highly recommend that you check that the first 25 source rows avoid combining values of different data types in any of the fields. You should even establish that any non-text values that you want to be treated as text values are embodied in single or double quotation marks.

If the source file has mixed values in the rows following the 25th row, the import operation could present you with error values or convert them incorrectly. For troubleshooting information, see the section Troubleshoot #Num! and incorrect values in a linked table, later in this article.
Field namesFor delimited text files, if the file excludes the fields’ names, it is a useful practice to arrange them in the first row. During the linking operation, you can programme Access to handle the values in the first row as field names. However, after you import fixed-width text files, there is no option for managing the values in the first row as field names.
  1. Exit the source file, if it is open.
  1. Launch the database in which you want to create the link. Check that the database is not read-only and that you have the essential permissions to overwrite changes to the database. If you don’t want to store the link in any of your existing databases, create a blank database.
  1. The location of the import/link text wizard varies minimally based upon your version of Access. Choose the steps that match your Access version:
  • If you’re using the latest version of the Microsoft 365 subscription version of Access or Access 2019, on the External Data tab, in the Import & Link group, pick New Data Source > From File > Text File.
  • If you’re using Access 2016, Access 2013, or Access 2010, on the External Data tab, in the Import & Link group, press Text File.

  1. Access opens the Get External Data – Text File dialogue box.Select to import, append, or link to a text file.
  2. In the Get External Data – Text File dialogue box, define the name of the text file that has the data to which you want to link in the File name box.
  1. Choose Link to the data source by creating a linked table and then click OK. The Link Text Wizard starts. This wizard assists you through the linking process.
  1. Access evaluates the contents of the file and advises how the file is organised. If the file uses a delimiting character to separate the fields, you should ensure that the Delimited option is picked. If the file has fixed-width fields, ensure that the Fixed Width option is selected.
  1. Select Next.
  1. The next page of the wizard that is shown is determined by whether you selected the delimited option or the fixed-width option. Delimited files  –  Pick or define the character that delimits the field values. If the file users a text qualifier, in the Text Qualifier box, click ” or . If the first row of the source file includes field names, select the First Row contains Field Names checkbox. Then, pick Next. Fixed-width files  –  The wizard displays the contents of the file. If Access senses a columnar structure in the data, it forms vertical lines in the data to divide the fields. Review the structure recommended by the wizard and, if preferable, follow the instructions on the wizard page to create, erase, or amend the lines. Then, press Next.

  1. On the next page of the wizard, Access showcases the field properties. Select a column in the lower half of the wizard page to illustrate the corresponding field’s properties. Inspect and alter, if you prefer, the name and data type of the destination fields. Access reviews the first 25 rows in each column to advise the standard data type for the corresponding field. If there are various types of values, such as text and numeric values, in the first 25 rows of a column, the wizard implies a data type that is matchable with all or most of the values in the column. In most cases, that is the text data type. Despite you being able to select another data type, remember that values that are poorly matched with the specified data type will either lead to error values or get converted improperly. For more information, see the next section, Troubleshoot #Num! and incorrect values in a linked table. What is the Advanced button used for? The Advanced button in the Import Text Wizard grants you the ability to design or enter a link specification in the format used by older versions of Access. Access provides no avenue to save a link specification, unlike import and export operations, so if you want to save the details of a link specification, select the Advanced button, format your desired options, and then press Save As.

  1. Choose Next.

  1. On the final page of the wizard, label the linked table and press Finish. If a table with that name already exists, Access prompts if you want to overwrite the existing table. Press Yes if you want to overwrite, or No to specify a different table name. Access endeavours with generating the linked table. If the table is successfully produced, Access presents the message Finished linking table…. Enter the linked table and review the fields and data to ensure you observe the correct data in all the fields.

Top of Page

Troubleshoot #Num! and incorrect values in a linked table

Regardless of whether you notice the message Finished linking table, you should still access the table in Datasheet view to confirm that all the rows and columns display the correct data.

If you see errors or inaccurate data anywhere in the table, take remedial action as outlined in the following table and try linking again. Remember that you will not be able to add the values physically to the linked table, since the table is read-only.

IssueResolution
-1 or 0 valuesIf the source file includes a field that contains only True or False values or only Yes or No values, and you picked Yes/No as the data type for the field, you will see -1 or 0 in the table. Access the table in Design view and set the Format property to True/False or Yes/No.
Multivalued fieldsOnce you link data, Access does not permit support for several values in a field. The list of values is deemed to be a single value and positioned in a text field, split by semicolons.
Truncated dataIf data looks truncated in a column, simply expand the width of the column in Datasheet view. If broadening the width doesn’t resolve the issue, the cause could be that the data type of a numeric field is set to Long Integer, when it needed to be set at Double.
#Num!After you open the table in Datasheet view, you may see that some fields have #Num! rather than the actual value. Do the following to minimise or eliminate any instances of null values in the source file:

Wrap all non-text values that you want to store as text values in single or double quotation marks.

During the linking operation, choose the appropriate data type for each field. If the data type is incorrect, the entire column may include only #Num! values for all the rows.

The following aspects displays cases where you will still see the #Num! error in fields:

If the values that are missing are of type…

1. Text

2. Date

3. Numeric

And the destination field type is…

1. Numeric or Date

2. Numeric

3. Date

You should…

1. Replace each text value with values that reflect the data type of the destination field and then proceed with linking again.

2. Replace every date value with numeric values and then perform linking again.

3. Replace each numeric value with date values and then run linking again.

Top of Page

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: